Books

Book Review: It’s Okay to Fail, My Son

It’s Okay to Fail, My Son by Vasant Kallola is a book intended for parents and educators to discuss how certain methods of education may hinder a child’s learnings and how children’s failures cannot be blamed completely on them.

By Aditi Amritesh

It’s Okay to Fail, My Son by Vasant Kallola is a book intended for parents and educators to discuss how certain methods of education may hinder a child’s learnings and how children’s failures cannot be blamed completely on them.

Rahul, an intelligent, well-to-do man does his best to connect with his impressionable 13-year-old son Sachin, who struggles with poor grades in school. Sachin faces extreme pressure to do well academically from his school principal and distant mother, leading him to decide that life isn’t worth living. When Rahul realises the severity of his son’s situation, he chooses to step in, leaving behind his corporate job. Thus begins a long journey, where Rahul transforms the lives of children deemed academic ‘hopeless cases’, inspiring those around him, finding unlikely allies, including the kind and smart teacher, Madhuri. However, people still oppose Rahul’s revolutionary teaching methods, such as veteran teacher Bhattacharya and twisted politician Dikshit. Can Rahul change his opponents, or does he crack under the pressure of adversity and criticism?

The alternative perspectives to education discussed in It’s Okay to Fail, My Son resounded with my own beliefs and would appeal to any child as an ideal method of enjoying their learning.

This book will not fail to convince adults and educators who are adhered to restrictive and archaic methods of education to experiment with more interesting and enjoyable teaching approaches which both inform and involve students.

What I loved about the book was how the author did not present his ideologies blandly, instead using a story to develop them and ingrain them into the reader’s mind. The story itself was charming and highly interesting, not hurriedly thrown together to use as a gimmick to market the book better. While the author’s ideologies were the book’s main theme, there was a lot of focus on character development. While I quite disliked certain characters at the start, my views of them had completely changed by the end of the book. There was also a good mix of emotions and genres in the story — a little tragedy, a little romance, a little comedy and a little of everything in between.

I recommend It’s Okay to Fail, My Son to anyone of any age. This book may just turn your life around, whatever age you may be.

If you’re young, a hope for a new way to learn will be instilled in your mind and if you’re someone with the ability to educate, you’ll have the power to create that new way to learn.

About the author

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